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What is a ‘bully pulpit’?

Teacher

When a high school student takes out a bully pulpit and announces his opinions, he’s giving a voice to students who otherwise might not have a voice, a new study finds.

The findings from a study published in the journal Educational Psychology, which was sponsored by the American Psychological Association, suggest that bullying in high schools may not be as pervasive as we think.

It also highlights the importance of bullying prevention education in the classroom. 

The researchers, who used data from the National Survey of High School Students (NSHS), found that students who are verbally aggressive are more likely to be punished, and those who are more verbally aggressive, verbally and physically, are more successful in staying out of trouble.

More than half of the students surveyed in the study reported at least one verbal attack or verbal threat during their last year of high school.

In the majority of cases, the bullying was done by someone they knew, and a majority of students said they were not threatened by the person.

The study also found that those who were bullied in a school setting were more likely than their peers to report that the bullying occurred at least once a week for at least two years.

Those who were not bullied at school also reported more verbal abuse, with those who received verbal abuse more likely also to report verbal abuse by someone else. 

“While these findings are consistent with previous research that suggests bullying is a relatively common behavior, our study provides new evidence to support this hypothesis,” said the study’s lead author, Jennifer Hurd, a graduate student at Penn State who is also the director of Penn State’s Center for Student Engagement.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are more than 1.3 million students enrolled in grades K-12 in the United States, which means they will likely be affected by bullying at some point in their lives. “

These findings suggest that addressing bullying and promoting school safety should be a priority for all schools and that teachers should be more involved in bullying prevention.” 

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are more than 1.3 million students enrolled in grades K-12 in the United States, which means they will likely be affected by bullying at some point in their lives.

A recent survey by the National Association of Secondary School Principals found that one in four students have experienced verbal or physical bullying at least some of the time during their high school years.

The findings from the study are also an update on earlier research.

Earlier studies had found that boys who bully were more than twice as likely to report being bullied at some time during high school than boys who did not bully, according to the Penn State study.

But that study had a smaller sample size, which might have resulted in a higher degree of validity, Hurd said.

The research was also supported by the Pennsylvania State University Center for Excellence in Student Engaging. 

 Read more: What is a bully Pulpit?

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